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20121104
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information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani talking on taxes, health care, energy. he's introduced by tom donohue. >> if i could have your attention, pl
. half of the budget is reform of the tax code to get the economy flat in the tax rates, lower the rates or on the base deutsch a trillion dollars of credits and the major corporations might take advantage to get the economy going and get revenues back up, get people back to work and you have less need for these programs and if it was to save the country to do it in a responsible way. >> i will get to it in a moment i'm not putting your words in your mouth. i want to understand in the short term over the next year or two would you cut the liheap funding of? diamondstone: if i were in the senate today i would spend as much money as i could get without breaking the back of the budget to bring back to those who needed in vermont. it lets people have more of their money don't you think. the government isn't. they would go without it is an absurdity. >> moderator: ms. ericson? ericson: my grandfather was born in the him perform and it used to be legal and if we legalize it again we could pay for liheap. legalizing and taxing marijuana and hemp won't pay for everything but if it comes between
economy. so thank you, erick. [applause] >> thank you. it's great to be here. h let me just quickly introduce our panelists. please have a seat. to my immediate left is grady burnett who's vice president of global marketing at facebook and lived in ann arbor for many years, so he's a local. mark hatch is the ceo of tech shop which has a recent facilita that opened up here not too far from the airport, we'll be talking about what we do there. danae ringelmann is the co-founder and coo of indiegogo, and david ten have is the ceo of ponoko which is a very interesting platform for manufacturing. what we're going to talk about today is the do-it-yourselfy, economy and how, how different h tools have become available to entrepreneurs beyond just whatav we've become accustomed to in the internet world. so the cost of producing a start-up, you know, has declined dramatically in the past decade, and we've seen this flowering of internet and mobile start-ups. but we're also starting to see many of those same tactics and techniques being used by start-ups in the other industries and particular
they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the economy, and i have the honor to have served the people of pennsylvania to have earned their trust and i would ask again to have the opportunity to earn the trust and i would ask for your vote on november 6. thank you. >> moderator: speed become a gentleman that concludes the debate and we want to think the candidates for taking part in this important program. we also want to think of course monica malpass and vernon odom from action news and thank you for watching. now we have these final words from our co-sponsors and thank you so much for being here. >> i of the league ofwomen voters of pennsylvania citizen education fund thinks the candidates for participating in this d
had and the clinton administration, those upper income earners were doing well and the entire economy was growing. we are going to have to make some tough choices. a balanced approach is the only approach that i believe will get us there. >> heather, your rebuttal. >> it is amazing to me, congressman, that you can stand here having voted for trillion dollar deficits for the last four years. the largest, fastest debt increase in american history and say that we have to control spending. you have done nothing to control spending of the last four years, and with respect to cuts, cap, and balance it is amazing to me also that the idea of cutting wasteful spending, capping the ability of congress to spend money we don't have and balancing the budget is extreme. i think it would force congress to set priorities and stop funding things like solyndra and prioritize things like social security, medicare, and education, and that is why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. >> the race to succeed retiring new mexico senator is just one of the key house, said, and governors r
and deter waste, fraud, and abuse, and improve the economy and efficiency of the agency. but our role was also to promote transparency and what the agency did, because i believe very strong and we believe are strongly that it was important for the citizens in the at the government was doing. that's the point in the law enforcement context, but in the intelligence area as well. we did reduce intelligence matters ranging from review of the robert hanssen case at the fbi, why wasn't the robert hanssen could be a spy and fbi missed for several decades, when it initially came out, the fbi said it was because of his wily tradecraft picking out to exploit the system and we are asked to look at it determined that that was not true. that they had lax internal security methods and that he it needed improvement. not only did we do that report but we also made public the findings of the report. a lot of people said how can you do that? this is a very sensitive area. it's top secret area, we push very hard to make an executive summary of the conclusions of that report now because we believe strong
of society along with rule of law, along with a stable economy, along with writing business. >> i have an answer that is probably quite controversial and it doesn't have to do with the military%, but it has to do with the policy on how the u.s. controls the development of medical devices and drugs. it has become so problematic that a fireman and medical technology developers are now going to other countries to do the clinical trials in the work necessary to prove that their devices work successfully in human. this is a very backwards way of promoting national security in the context of preventing people from disease and injury through advanced technology. budget is important i think that if our industry and the health sector is turning to other countries that we maintain strong relationships with those countries and make sure there's a handshake there between our medical professionals and their medical professionals, that were not just experimenting on their populations. i think that is an important unintended consequence of our current policy. >> if i could pile on to your question. i
designates 36 bank holding companies as liable to create the instability in the u.s. economy if they fail. in addition, it goes on to permit the financial stability oversight council. it designates an unknown number of additional nonbank institutions that could create instability in the u.s. economy. now what does it mean when congress gives this authority or designates this notion in the statute? what it says is these institutions are too big to fail. so not only are we worried about the too big to fail but we have made the problem worse by actually embedded in the statute for these banking institutions and promoting the fsoc to designate certain institutions and we understand just from reading the newspapers that they have for the large insurance companies and in one case a finance company to be designated as too big to fail. what does it mean? what effect does that have? on the creditors will get these institutions and much safer investments than others. first of all once they are so designated they are supposed to be regulated stringently by the fed to really don't know what stringent
, and the minute that the story started, in "the new york times" and the "washington post" that iran and economy is indeed in great trouble, the goal posts tend to shift a little bit. matters no longer by getting them back to the table are getting a deal, but now more and more open question marks were raised about can this actually lead to regime change, cannot have it for a couple more months to see what else we can get. as that happens, the interest of the suffering party then decreases to engage indigo should as well because the negotiations can become a negotiation for the terms -- and instead they tend to define their search for the next game changer. something that will once again be able to turn the table and find an exit way from the very situation there and what now but look what happened after the talks collapsed in 2010 and 2009 if the iranians started and enrichment at the 20 some of the there were question marks, significant question marks whether the iranians were succeeding in doing this but they managed to do it. the western imposes sanctions on iran hoping that would change the
economies combined come if you follow the money, which you are taught to do in business, the path leads you. third, focus on a domestic capability rather than safely delivering a sale. in the case of this, the value proposition was not about selling the best locomotive. it was all about helping saudi arabia develop its domestic rail infrastructure and matured through training and education and managing that rail system through the creation of a career in transportation. think about growing saudi arabia and talent and not hiring saudi arabians. many are aggressive in seeking out saudi arabian students for some programs. now, as they graduate, we will bring them on for training within the company. with the intent of starting them out in entry-level managers and engineers in the kingdom. they are starting a career. not just being hired on for a job. they did all this. they beat the competition. they won. other american companies are making a significant impact. not just on their businesses, but also on the future of saudi arabia. exxon mobil has a long tradition in the kingdom. among their suc
requirement. it's already done. and so there's still, there's people -- now, when the economy changes, could it impact us? yes. but right now i feel it has not impacted our recruiting, it has not impacted our quality, operationally it has not impacted us and, hopefully, that will continue. >> general, you've been in the job for a little over a year now. god willing and things go right, you've got three more years to go. i know that much of the decade before you took this job you were not in the middle of the night waking up and saying, okay, what would i do if i were the chief because you had other things on your mind. [laughter] what has surprised you the most in terms of coming in in this circumstance? >> well, i think one of the things, i guess i've got to be careful. i was the commander in iraq and the commander of the corps there. i had the freedom to make some pretty significant decisions -- [laughter] that freedom is not quite the same here in washington. [laughter] so, you know, that's probably one of the biggest adjustments. i had to realize that i didn't have complete autonomy, but
but every state has grown. and over the last couple of years as the economy has started to rebound a little bit, very slowly, especially with long-term unemployment remaining very high, we've also seen the growth in snap begin to level off. so come and then again this week of course i think it's important to think about the ability of the programs that respond not just economic conditions but also to disasters. there's a feature the the program that enables snap to be one of the first programs that is on the ground offering help to people and grocery stores doctor reopen, and very temporary help of only a month or two. so that's really important. participation rates among those who are eligible are very high. the most recent estimates for 2009 but we have no reason to think it come down since then, and in 2000 the department of agriculture found 72% of all individuals who are eligible participated in snap. almost 90% of the benefits for which people qualified were actually paid to these eligible people, or provided helpful people on their ebt card, meaning that the people are most likely to
of the factories you going to have a collapsing economy that will drag it right back into instability. this is going to be a very difficult trade off. with regard to the country splitting up, lebanonization, i would hope that would not happen. if there is a kurdish group in the north that wants to separate out, i can pretty much assure you that turks would not be welcoming of that concept. so that might cause some difficulties. there may be some warlord for a while, the brutality of assad kept things in check for a long time. what would israel gain from a conflict? as far as i can see, it's losing on all sides on this one. it's in a very insecure area. much more than at any time in its history. >> that the organization if you of this region is something which -- from is a lot of people see different patterns. for example, with iraq breakup to a sunni stand, as she is down? and yet you think about iraq being arabic, not sunni but it's hard to see the kurds have a lot of ambition and the absence of power, the absence of the state encourages kurdish ambitions both in iraq as we see when
doing well and the entire economy was growing. we are going to have to make some tough choices and a balanced approach is the only approach i believe will get us there. >> heather, your rebuttal? >> it's amazing to me congressman heinrich that you can stand here having voted for a trillion dollar deficits for the last four years, the largest debt increase in american history and say that we have to control spending. you have done nothing to control spending over the last four years and with respect to cut gap and balance it's amazing to me also this idea of cutting wasteful spending, capping the ability of congress to spend money we don't have and balancing the budget is extreme. i think it would force congress to set priorities and stop funding things like solyndra and prioritize things like social security, medicare and education and that is why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. e. republican congressman robert dold and democratic challenger brad schneider are in a tight race for the tenth congr
with representatives guinta unseeing two-time winner shea-porter. we'll focus on the economy as well as the affordable care act. representatives guinta has promised to repeal the health care law and shea-porter says that contribute to a 2010 months. this is just under an hour. >> brought to you by aarp new hampshire. the first congressional district debate. now, live from the wbin studios, charlie sherman. >> welcome to the second of our wbin debate series. it's our pleasure to welcome democrat and republican candidates in the race for the first congressional district of new hampshire. over the next hour we'll focus on the issues that matter most to citizens of new hampshire. but first, the debate rules. kandinsky one minute to respond to direct questions come at 32nd rebuttals will be given as time allows. we'll be doing two rounds of questions in which candidates will have up to 60 seconds to respond. we'll also have questions from our debate sponsor, aarp new hampshire and some questions from new hampshire voters that wbin reporters have collected over the past week. time permitting, will also have
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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